Yellow
Tan
LT1 350 V8
4 Speed Automatic

The SpeedStar is a Bobby Alloway-designed '33 Ford roadster unlike any other. If you're not familiar with Bobby Alloway, he's the man behind Alloway's Hot Rod Shop in Tennessee. He left his full-time gig at a Ford dealership to pursue building hot rods full time, and if you've never heard of the Ridler-award-winning builder, then you're just not paying attention. The original SpeedStar was built in 1995, and Alloway, working with his friend George Long of Rats Glass, pulled a few molds off it in an attempt to recoup the costs of building the original (which went on to win more than a few national awards). What he ended up with was a phenomenon that took the rodding world by storm, winning award after award for its unique and modern take on the classic 1933 Ford.

This 1933 SpeedStar roadster was professionally built by Hot Rod City, and features the very best components and craftsmanship as it should be, since this car was their showpiece for several years. It lived in their showroom, carefully separated from curious fingers, and perfectly preserved. I can't imagine what it cost to build, but judging by the level of craftsmanship and detail that went into it, it was easily six figures.

First off, this might be the nicest fiberglass body I've ever seen. Not only is it straight, but the finish inside and out is nothing short of astounding. There are no waves, no ripples, no thin areas where the substrate is visible, and I had to check twice to make sure the hood and hood sides weren't steel, they're so nice. Clearly the guys building this car took the already nice Rats Glass body and elevated it to the next level through hundreds of hours of filling, massaging, and plain old block sanding to get it this nice. Alignment is near perfect, and body lines are highlighted as part of the design.

The paint is a custom mixed House of Color candy pearl yellow that isn't quite yellow, but isn't gold, either. There's a lot of pearl in there so that it changes depending on the angle of the light hitting it, and a bit of metallic makes it glisten in the sunlight. But a brilliant color isn't enough to build a show-winning rod like this; no, you need trick graphics to accentuate the body shape, and the details on this car are nothing short of breathtaking. The graphics were carefully designed, then applied in a multi-step process, adding colors and textures to the highlighted areas that appear to look like stone. You could spend an hour just looking at the striping alone on this car; it's so intricate and highly detailed.

Out back, that trick stone-look paint surrounds the one-piece taillight that extends the width of the body and is embedded in the paint for a seamless look. The windshield is a smooth affair that is gracefully integrated into the bodywork and that really helps transform the looks of the neo-33 Ford shape. The hand-made side-view mirrors are custom shaped to flow with the body, and up front, I really like the powerful, yet vintage-looking headlights mounted down low on the upper shock mounts. Parking lights and turn signals have been hidden behind the stainless steel grille, visible only when they're active, while a retractable license plate bracket under the rear of the car keeps you legal while you're on the road, but hides the plate when you're parked.

You just can't build a rod that looks like this and put a tepid engine inside, so instead you'll find a built 350 cubic inch LT1 power plant from a Corvette. From the factory, it generated an even 300 horsepower, but with the aluminum heads and exhaust system on this car, I'd wager it's a little more as it sits today. The block and other components were given a matching coat of that candy pearl yellow, and everything else was polished or chromed. The intake plenum and chrome valve covers feature candy pearl yellow details, too. Lokar supplied the braided stainless steel throttle linkage and billet dip sticks, while a K&N air cleaner lives up front. A custom-fabricated radiator is nestled at an angle into the nose of the car, and features highly polished tanks and a billet cap and overflow tank, while a new GM LT1 reverse-flow water pump keeps the coolant flowing. Down low there's a rack and pinion system with a new steering shaft and U-joints, all painted black to keep them out of sight. Ceramic coated block-hugger headers handle the exhaust, dumping into a dual exhaust system with Flowmaster mufflers and chrome tailpipes and tips.

But don't make the mistake of thinking this is a bare-bones rod that'll punish you when you drive it far from it. Starting with the 4L60E 4-speed automatic, this car has an easy-to-drive demeanor that means it's just as comfortable cruising to the grocery store as it is hammering down Route 66 (not that you'll do much grocery shopping in a 2-seater with a tiny trunk, but you could if you wanted to). The frame is a custom-fabricated piece from Total Cost Involved (TCI), and includes boxed frame rails, which was painted to match the body. In true hot rodding fashion, all the welds and joints were addressed before paint, making the bottom as show-worthy as the top. The front suspension is from Heidts, and features a new cross member, polished stainless steel upper and lower A-arms, 2-inch dropped spindles, and new Aldan coil over shocks. Of course, all the bushings, bearings, and seals are new, and there are polished stainless steel ball joint caps with chrome tie rod ends dressing up all the exposed suspension components. 11-inch GM disc brakes were used up front for reliable stopping power and easy servicing, although the aluminum calipers have been polished to a mirror-like shine.

Out back, there's a new fully independent Winters "Quick Change" rear that is fully polished and detailed for show. Since it's a part of the rear visuals of the car, no expense was spared making sure that all the components tucked under the back of this car are in top condition, both mechanically and visually. The links, struts, bearing assemblies, half shafts, flanges, tie bars, adjusters, U-joints, and just about everything else back there is polished aluminum or chrome plated for a dazzling look. There are inboard disc brakes, just in case everything else wasn't quite cool enough for your liking. All the lines are polished stainless, and the fuel tank is brand new. Wheels are gorgeous Boyd Coddington billet pieces, 17s up front and massive 20s out back, wearing BFGoodrich g-Force T/A radials.

The interior? Like artwork. Those trick graphics that cover the outside of the car continue inside, where they are rendered in multi-colored leather on the seats and door panels. Deep bucket seats invite you to take a drive, and they're covered in high quality 2-tone leather with stitching that matches the graphics on the center of the hood. The door panels are upholstered to match, with inserts of purple leather that mimic the graphics on the sides of the hood, and it all has a way cool wave pattern that flows throughout the interior. The carpets are new and bound with matching leather for a perfect fit. The dash has been painted to match the exterior, and Dakota Digital gauges have been installed, including speedometer, tachometer, oil pressure, water temperature, fuel level, and voltage. The steering column is from Billet Specialties and is topped with a Budnik steering wheel wrapped in matching tan leather. The billet shifter, brake pedal, and accelerator pedal assembly are all from Lokar. Under the power-actuated trunk lid, you'll find a beautiful trunk that has been upholstered to match, with a removable panel hiding the stereo system and gas tank filler neck.

Documentation includes a professional appraisal by SoCal Auto Appraisals in Ontario California, pinning the value of this incredible rod at $82,500.00. Built for six figures, and available today for less than it's worth? I doubt this one will last long.

If you're looking for a show-stopping (and show-winning) rod that is turn-key and ready to drive today, look no further. There's no need to spend more than the asking price and wait for two or three years to get your heart-stoppingly gorgeous '33 Ford roadster, it's right here. The parts are all first rate from the biggest names in the business, the styling is timeless, the paint scheme is contemporary (teal paint with pink scallops it is not!), and it could easily pass for a recent build. It is fully sorted and everything functions properly. I'm sensing a trend with rodding lately, and it's probably fueled by the economy guys spent big when money was cheap, and build some truly amazing hot rods without thinking about the budget. Then things got tight, and they have to let them go for a fraction of the amount they have invested. That's 100% good news for our customers, and it puts tier-one rods like this one within easy reach of guys who never dreamed of owning a pro-built show car. If you've dreamed, well, here's your car. Indulge yourself and call today!

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